Glowstone Inlays

Copper

Cu

Copper is an element of the periodic table and is a widely used metal for its ductility and malleability. It’s an excellent thermal and electrical conductor which is the reason why it is used in electrical wiring. Copper can oxidize, turning it from a shiny metallic color to a greenish blue patina. This color change is most evident in the Statue of Liberty.

Sodalite

Na4Al3Si3O12Cl

Sodalite is a rich, royal blue semi-precious gemstone widely used in ornamental jewelry. Certain samples can be opaque, although many can also be transparent or translucent. The stone often has stripes and veins of white and lighter blue within its deep indigo hue.

Malachite

Cu2CO3(OH)2

Malachite is a ore-like banded gemstone. Its composition makes it show stripes throughout the stone. It was one of the first minerals used to produce copper metal, and its color is an opaque light to dark green.

Amethyst

SiO2

Amethyst is a semi-precious purple type of quartz. It is used widely as a stone for jewelry for its vibrant hues. Its color can range from a light, almost clear purple to a deep violet.

Emerald

Be3Al2(SiO3)6

Emerald is a gemstone that is a variety of the mineral beryl. It has a green hue that can range from a light jade to a dark mossy green. It has a Mohs hardness of 7.5 – 8 and is a gemstone used widely in jewelry.

Opal

SiO2.nH2O

Opal is a stone made up of hydrated silica. Each opal molecule is packed together in a way that breaks up white light into different colors, much like a prism. These colors can range from fiery reds and oranges to cool blues, greens, and violets.

Seashell

Many people remember going to the beach and searching for the small shells that wash up in the sand. Seashells are hard pieces of protection for the creatures that used to live in them. Eventually they out grow them, leaving their old shells behind.